Using the G20 as an excuse to justify state violence

On the pretext of the upcoming G20 meeting in Buenos Aires, the government is promoting the notion of “internal enemies” and trying to justify greater levels of persecution of political dissidence and repression and criminalization of protest.

  

Human Rights in Argentina: Our 2017 report in broad strokes

Argentina is known globally for its hard-fought Memory, Truth and Justice process over the crimes committed during the 1976-1983 dictatorship. But numerous other human rights achievements have been enshrined in the country’s constitution, laws, regulations and jurisprudence over the years. Today, some of those are at risk.

  

One month since the repression of December 14

Seven people remain detained over incidents related to the protests of December 14 and 18, in the framework of criminal cases filed at the federal level. These prolonged detentions based on weak arguments imply very worrisome processes of criminalization. This situation also worsens the deterioration of conditions in which criminal processes unfold, hindering the right to defense.

  

Protest, social movements and state crackdowns

A fresh round of content published on our Right to Protest platform covers ground across the world: from Kenya, Hungary and Australia to Peru, Canada and Argentina. The threats to this fundamental right can be seen on the street, with violent repressions, and in terms of state surveillance and judicial persecution. This online project was developed by openDemocracy, CELS and INCLO, with support from the ACLU.

  

The right to protest is in danger

A violent and intimidating police operation. Arbitrary detentions. Federal criminal charges. Political support for police violence. No specific legal framework for regulating the intervention of federal security forces in protests. Threats by political authorities, violent actions by security forces and their judicial validation – all of these are ways of limiting the right to protest.

  

In defense of the agreements forged in democracy

On Monday, December 4, the 2017 Annual Report edited by Siglo XXI will become available. The prologue, which we are sharing in advance, calls attention to decisions, measures and events that adversely affect critical items on the human rights agenda as well as protection mechanisms. The government response to grave incidents, repeated incidents of repression and discourses about present-day threats and episodes from the past put the human rights consensuses achieved in Argentina on alert. These have been compounded by judicial decisions that take aim at some of the pillars of democracy. This situation requires safeguarding human rights principles from the dynamic of overall polarization.

  

The Right to Protest worldwide

We are unveiling an online platform that brings together original articles, videos and interviews on the right to protest, at a time when demonstrations are proliferating worldwide and states often respond with violence. This project was developed by openDemocracy, CELS and INCLO, with support from the ACLU.

  

Milagro Sala: Appeals court revoked her house arrest

The Chamber of Appeals and Control of Jujuy province revoked Milagro Sala’s house arrest today, without revealing the grounds for its decision and in utter breach of the precautionary measure ordered by the IACHR. The federal state, guarantor of Argentina’s international obligations, must take all the steps needed to fully comply with IACHR Resolution 23/2017.

  

Human rights crisis in Venezuela

The Venezuelan government did not protect the right to life and restricted the rights to freedom of expression, of assembly and of political participation. The United States government imposed new legal and financial sanctions on the country. The situation requires the international community’s active commitment to support Venezuela in finding a sovereign way out of the crisis.

  

What Obama Should Know About Macri’s Argentina

Milagro Sala’s arbitrary detention occurs in the context of multiple measures taken by the Macri administration that have weakened the rule of law on the pretext of security, economic freedom and the “war on drugs.” By Gastón Chillier and Ernesto Semán.