Grave human rights crisis in Nicaragua

The repression of social protest carried out by Nicaraguan security forces and para-police groups has left at least 273 people dead and 1800 injured in the last three months. What started with demonstrations against a pension reform has ballooned into a human rights crisis.

  

Protest, social movements and state crackdowns

A fresh round of content published on our Right to Protest platform covers ground across the world: from Kenya, Hungary and Australia to Peru, Canada and Argentina. The threats to this fundamental right can be seen on the street, with violent repressions, and in terms of state surveillance and judicial persecution. This online project was developed by openDemocracy, CELS and INCLO, with support from the ACLU.

  

The right to protest is in danger

A violent and intimidating police operation. Arbitrary detentions. Federal criminal charges. Political support for police violence. No specific legal framework for regulating the intervention of federal security forces in protests. Threats by political authorities, violent actions by security forces and their judicial validation – all of these are ways of limiting the right to protest.

  

The Right to Protest worldwide

We are unveiling an online platform that brings together original articles, videos and interviews on the right to protest, at a time when demonstrations are proliferating worldwide and states often respond with violence. This project was developed by openDemocracy, CELS and INCLO, with support from the ACLU.

  

Human rights crisis in Venezuela

The Venezuelan government did not protect the right to life and restricted the rights to freedom of expression, of assembly and of political participation. The United States government imposed new legal and financial sanctions on the country. The situation requires the international community’s active commitment to support Venezuela in finding a sovereign way out of the crisis.

  

What Obama Should Know About Macri’s Argentina

Milagro Sala’s arbitrary detention occurs in the context of multiple measures taken by the Macri administration that have weakened the rule of law on the pretext of security, economic freedom and the “war on drugs.” By Gastón Chillier and Ernesto Semán.